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Friday
Feb202015

'Braving Ebola' in Chronogram Magazine

 Photographer Daniel Berehulak spent five weeks in Monrovia, Liberia, in the fall of 2014 documenting the Ebola outbreak that has claimed thousand of lives in West Africa. His stark black-and-white portraits show the faces of Ebola workers and survivors. Sweat drips down from grave diggers and doctors alike. Some look defeated, some determined; they all appear to be looking beyond or through the camera—at the future or the past, it's hard to say. There's a lingering spiteful bitterness in those few subjects who smiled for the camera, an existential joke they're either laughing with or at. Berehulak's exhibit "Braving Ebola," presented by Fovea, is on display through February 8 at Hudson Beach Glass in Beacon.

Wednesday
Jul022014

Hyperallergic On "War & Memory" Exhibit

The Veteran Experience, Before and Behind the Lens

by Faheem Haider

Scott Ostrom looks over his military service records and weeps after being told his apartment application had been turned down. Westminster, Colorado. May 6, 2011. (Photograph by Craig F. Walker/ Courtesy The Homecoming Project/Fovea Exhibitions.)

BEACON, New York — War & Memory is drawn from the archives of The Homecoming Project, a photo-based storytelling outfit interested in fostering conversations about the experience of wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere. The show, held at the photography-focused Fovea Exhibitions, features the work of 11 photojournalists and 11 returned veterans chronicling various aspects of the war experience. The photojournalists are all at the top of their respective games — many of them work with VII, Magnum, and the New York Times. One is a Pulitzer Prize winner. Perversely, though you’d expect their work installed on the gallery walls at eye level to look a lot like the work on the Times’s Lens Blog (the long-distance war-watcher’s favorite photo outlet), it actually works in a different way.

The show pictures the negotiations mostly white males from particular socioeconomic backgrounds have made since 2001. It hints at violence, rupture and the miseries of missing someone, or missing a leg.  Interestingly, the work by the photojournalists reads a little too invasively, like personal ruin porn. The photographers and you and I are voyeurs, guilty, peeking through a pinhole for some rummaged mess. A soldier who might be holding his family close for the last time perhaps deserves to spend that moment away from the maddening lens, no matter its documentary import.

Specialist Frank Casillas waited for a ride home outside McGrath Gym following the welcome home ceremony. Fort Drum, New York. March 2011. (Photograph by Damon Winter/Courtesy The Homecoming Project/ Fovea Exhibitions.)

But the work by veterans and their families works on a more varied register. Consisting of photos, text, and a sole sculpture, it is confessional and cathartic. Monica, a young Hispanic woman, submitted a photo of her last visit home with her two younger brothers, both of whom were killed in combat. On the other side of the photo you can read the last letter one of the young men wrote her. That piece feels like a shrine to a specific memory, and, therefore, holy. A veteran, now studying art, offered a sculpture of a folded flag usually given to the survivors of the dead. This is the story of prisoners of conscience.

2014 is the centenary of World War I: a hundred years of modern warfare, on the ground and from the sky. We’re supposed to draw down from Afghanistan this year, yet Senators McCain and Graham are again demanding another war in Iraq. Last Thursday, President Obama declared that’s a no go, but no doubt we’ll be fighting a war over there all the same. The thing that gets missed in all this bluster is the war at home: that more soldiers now commit suicide than are killed in combat; that class and its corollaries control who goes to war and for how many tours; that soldiers coming home suffer among the highest unemployment rates in this country; that it’s only now the Department of Veterans Affairs has moved things around so that veterans can access the healthcare they were promised and deserve.

War & Memory continues at Fovea Exhibitions (143 Main Street, Beacon, NY) through July 6.

Monday
Apr072014

Photo District News covers Conservation Journal Exhibit

http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/01/25481

“Conservation Journal: Photographs by Jason Houston” is currently on view at Fovea Exhibitions in Beacon, New York, through April 6, 2014. “‘Conservation Journal’ explores the complex dynamics at the intersections of nature and culture,” Fovea said in a statement. “Understanding where people live can help inform how we approach environmental conservation work around the world.” Houston, based in Colorado, is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to create educational and informative content to help protect the environment.

 

“Conservation Journal: Photographs by Jason Houston” is currently on view at Fovea Exhibitions in Beacon, New York, through April 6, 2014. “‘Conservation Journal’ explores the complex dynamics at the intersections of nature and culture,” Fovea said in a statement. “Understanding where people live can help inform how we approach environmental conservation work around the world.” Houston, based in Colorado, is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to create educational and informative content to help protect the environment.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/01/25481#sthash.pNfwQuIp.dpuf

“Conservation Journal: Photographs by Jason Houston” is currently on view at Fovea Exhibitions in Beacon, New York, through April 6, 2014. “‘Conservation Journal’ explores the complex dynamics at the intersections of nature and culture,” Fovea said in a statement. “Understanding where people live can help inform how we approach environmental conservation work around the world.” Houston, based in Colorado, is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to create educational and informative content to help protect the environment.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/01/25481#sthash.pNfwQuIp.dpuf

“Conservation Journal: Photographs by Jason Houston” is currently on view at Fovea Exhibitions in Beacon, New York, through April 6, 2014. “‘Conservation Journal’ explores the complex dynamics at the intersections of nature and culture,” Fovea said in a statement. “Understanding where people live can help inform how we approach environmental conservation work around the world.” Houston, based in Colorado, is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to create educational and informative content to help protect the environment.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/01/25481#sthash.pNfwQuIp.dpuf

“Conservation Journal: Photographs by Jason Houston” is currently on view at Fovea Exhibitions in Beacon, New York, through April 6, 2014. “‘Conservation Journal’ explores the complex dynamics at the intersections of nature and culture,” Fovea said in a statement. “Understanding where people live can help inform how we approach environmental conservation work around the world.” Houston, based in Colorado, is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to create educational and informative content to help protect the environment.

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/01/25481#sthash.pNfwQuIp.dpuf
Monday
Dec022013

Philipstown Journal on Grandma Techno's book launch & dance party

Fovea Hosts Book Launch and Techno Dance Party on Nov. 23

November 21, 2013

The world premiere launch party celebrating the arrival of the book Falling Into Place by photographer Patricia Lay-Dorsey, will be held at Fovea on Saturday, Nov. 23, followed by ‘Grandma Techno’s Dance Party’ hosted by DJ illich Mujica.

falling into place foveaLay-Dorsey, (Grandma Techno), will be back in Beacon from her hometown of Detroit. Lay-Dorsey was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1988, and in 2008 began taking self portraits with the intention of showing the day-to-day life of a person with a disability.

She has also been a regular at Detroit’s annual electronic-music extravaganza for the last nine years, earning the nickname Grandma Techno. She intends to distribute her book to school and university libraries, to disability organizations and rehab centers and to health care providers and doctors.

Falling Into Place will be on sale for a special price of $30.

The evening will begin at 7 p.m. with a book signing and a short artist talk. At 8:30 p.m. Dorsey and Mujica will present a collaborative event that features a slideshow of images from Falling Into Place and Mujica’s musical response. Then at 9 p.m. DJ Mujica’s mixes will morph into ‘Grandma Techno’s Dance Party’ when the lights are turned down and the music is turned up. The dance party is free and open to the public. Fovea Exhibitions is located at 143 Main St., Beacon. Visit foveaexhibitions.org.

Monday
Dec022013

Poughkeepsie Journal reviews the Beacon Portrait Project

Portrait exhibit captures Beacon residents

Photographer's project on display at Fovea through Jan. 5

By David Aderson| For the Poughkeepsie Journal
December 1, 2013

It was five years ago that a local photographer began her journey photographing each and every Beacon resident.

Though she has yet to accomplish her goal, Beacon resident and photographer Meredith Heuer is well on her way. On display at Fovea Exhibitions, 143 Main St., Beacon, through Jan. 5, is The Beacon Portrait Project: A Visual Map of Community.

“You have artists, people who work in the prisons, people who are walking dogs,” said Heuer. “You have every kind of person here. That’s true of a larger city for sure, but it’s not necessarily true for a community of this size … that’s the really special thing about it.”

The Beacon Portrait Project, according to Heuer, currently features 60 portraits, encompassing 100 Beacon residents including children, parents, families, workers and others. Heuer, along with Fovea co-director Sabine Meyer, organized a selection of 20 portraits to showcase for the exhibition.

“It creates this mark or picture for the next hundred years of you and I,” said Meyer, in regard to portrait making. “It gives significance not just to your life, but your family, kids, grandkids. The same way you build a family album for yourself, this (project) is sort of the family album of this community.”

Heuer, who moved to Beacon from San Francisco, Calif., with her family nine years ago, conceived the idea for the project while living on the West Coast. Intrigued by Beacon’s history, revitalization and unique residents, she took to the streets in an effort to document all of Beacon’s inhabitants.

“I was really excited about living in a much smaller, more intimate community,” said Heuer, before admitting her original estimate of 2,000 Beacon residents was slightly off.

According to the U. S. Census Bureau, Beacon’s population in 2012 was 15,346 residents.

Poised to photograph as many Beaconites as she could, Heuer developed a “line system,” in which each photographed person would suggest another resident for her to take a picture of. This process, according to Heuer, was a practical solution, but also created uncertainty.

“People were always on their way somewhere and there was no context to the picture necessarily,” Heuer said. “The good thing about it was that it was keeping me out of my social circle.

“A lot of times, what we would end up talking about was what we liked about Beacon. That’s what we definitely had in common,” she said.

Using a traditional film camera, Heuer discovered that photographing each subject in a place they felt most comfortable produced the best photos. Oftentimes, these places would turn out to be a room in the resident’s home.

“Everyone had a point in their home that felt like a safe place that they had made for themselves,” Heuer said. “I felt like they would be more at ease and show themselves to me in a different way.”

Heuer, a Detroit, Mich. native, has had her photography shown globally in publications including Fortune, Gourmet, The New York Times, Bon Appetit Magazine and more, according to her website, http://www.meredithheuer.com/" alt="" title="" target="_blank">meredithheuer.com.

In curating the event, Meyer had little trouble working with Heuer and her portraits — each of which currently hangs in unison, white framed and matted on Fovea’s walls.

“The photography was so well thought-out, so well realized, that it was really easy to put together,” said Meyer. “It sort of naturally fell in place.”

Founded in Beacon in May 2007, Fovea Exhibitions, co-directed by Meyer and Stephanie Heimann, was established as a space dedicated to showcasing humanitarian and social issues through the art of photojournalism.

“I feel like we have given a window of knowledge to what’s going on in the world about photography to a lot of people who weren’t exposed to it before,” Meyer said. “It’s a real creative outlet.”

Looking back at her work, Heuer said the project has reaffirmed her passion for photography.

“This really made me believe more firmly in myself as a photographer,” Heuer said. “This isn’t finished. I’m going to continue this probably for the rest of my life. To bring it to this one stopping point at 100 (people) felt really good.”

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